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CNN
Jul 17, 2011 7:30am EDT
force. he's deploying to the front lines of afghanistan to treat the war wound. but before he goes, he along with other military medical personnel will complete a tour of duty here at the university of maryland shock trauma center in baltimore. sharpening their ability to deal with critical trauma patients. >> the wounds appear to be superficial. >> category "a" now. >> trauma. >> trooper one. 15 up, 10 minutes back, fall from tree. category "a," priority 1. >> every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled into these bays. some are accident victims. this young man came with multiple stab wounds. but right alongside the civilian trauma doctors, nurses and techs, military personnel. colonel david powers, a surgeon, runs the military training program here. >> the injuries i've treated here and that i see her at this hospital are the closest thing to the injuries i saw in iraq that i've experienced in the continental united states. >> >> reporter: listen to what powers has encountered in recent weeks here. >> i've had a gentleman whose entire scalp was torn off in an industrial acci
CNN
Jul 10, 2011 7:30am EDT
afghanistan. but still u.s. troops are going to be there for years to come. come fall it will be a full decade we've been at war. so this week and next we're taking a closer look at an aspect that's easy to miss, at least until your life is on the line. i'm talking about the impact this war has had on medical care, no the just for wounded troops, but also here at home. one pretty stark example is the care that saved the life of congresswoman gabrielle giffords. a bullet through the head. the kind of wound you might see in combat. dr. peter reed was running the emergency room that day. but he learned his trade in iraq with the navy. he says with the wound like giffords' had, a decade ago, a lot of doctors would have given up before they even started. >> for most handgun injuries through and through to the head, the chance of them going to the operating room are exceedingly low. but now a days, now that we've gotten our experience about penetrating trauma from the recent iraq experience, we're aggressive about getting to the operating room. >> in iraq and afghanistan, we've learned t
CNN
Jul 16, 2011 4:30am PDT
we are learning on the battlefields of afghanistan and iraq. it can be translated to civilian care. >> this lieutenant colonel is a flight surgeon. >> expect to be a jack of all trades. we are not deployed and i'm an outpatient internal medicine guy. >> before getting to afghanistan, he says, this will help him learn to prioritize multiple critical patients under battlefield conditions and sharpen his ability to make rapid decisions. >> i expect to see gunshot wounds. i expect to see traumatic brain injuries from explosive devices. it means burns as well. a lot of orthopedic injuries and really some horrific stuff. what i'm doing here is getting exposure to the things i will be seeing over there. it is an immersion in a high-volume trauma center. >> you may not realize it, but treating the war wounded has long before a source of knowledge for all doctors. >> there has been a century long interplay with the civilian and military care. in many ways, trauma surgeons have learned from military conflict than any other component of care. >> as the patient continues to recover, the doctor
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)